Pastorale, op.27 (by “Anton Vodorinski”)                                            Back to list of works index                            

 

Medium

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Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223700

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

 

 

Pensée fantastique (= Impromptu no.2)

 

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Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223699

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

 

 

Pensée intime

 

This tuneful piece for flute and piano was deposited in the British Museum in 1897.

 

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Synthesizer

Stephen Berry

private recording

 

mp3

2016

 

TM

 

 

Pensées joyeuses 

 

Medium

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Label

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Date

Review

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Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223700

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

 

 

Petit caprice

 

This piece for piano with orchestral accompaniment was published in 1923, under the ungrammatical title “Petite Caprice.”  It is almost certainly the same piece as the Caprice for piano and orchestra which Ketèlbey performed at Trinity College of Music on 6th April 1892. The review in The Musical Times (May 1892) ran:

At the Orchestral Concert given at Princes' Hall, on the 6th ult., two new works by students were played for the first time… a Caprice, for pianoforte and orchestra by A.W. Ketelbey. The latter young gentleman is evidently old-fashioned enough to take Mendelssohn for a model, and to believe in the value of an extended, formal melody, such as he has been so fortunate as to invent for his charming second subject.  His music is clear, graceful, and continuous; it displays an agreeable fancy, lightness of touch, and considerable knowledge of effect.

 

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Synthesizer

Stephen Berry

private recording

 

mp3

2016

 

TM

 

 

Petite danse

 

This attractive piece for flute and piano dates from 1898.

 

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Synthesizer

Stephen Berry

private recording

 

mp3

2016

 

TM

 

 

Polly: selection, “arranged by Albert W. Ketelbey from Mr Gay’s music”

 

Polly was an 18th-century ballad opera with libretto by Gay and music consisting mainly of pre-existing tunes, harmonised merely by a bass.   It was a sequel to the well-known Beggar’s Opera.  When it was revived for the London stage in 1923, the composer Frederick Austin undertook the arrangement of the music, which involved new harmonies and orchestrations.  This was to be recorded by HMV. 

 

The rival record company Columbia decided to cash in on the publicity, and commissioned their house musician Ketèlbey to make his own arrangement from Gay’s original source, which was of course out of copyright.  His selection was duly recorded in direct competition with HMV’s version.

 

HMV and Austin sued Columbia and Ketèlbey for breach of copyright.  After a very colourful trial (reported in Musical Opinion August 1923, p.1085-1087) judgement was awarded in favour of HMV and Columbia.  The judge pointed out that there were cases where Ketèlbey had clearly copied the dramatic context of Bridge’s version.  For instance, where Bridge wrote an exit symphony, Ketèlbey followed suit (in Depair leads to battle).  Several of the melodies had been divided between soprano and baritone voices, and Ketèlbey’s orchestration had similar divisions between high and low melodic instruments at the same phrases (e.g. Though woman be a pretty craft).  My own comparison of the two versions has discovered that 6 of the 18 songs have at least a tenuous resemblance.

 

The recording was withdrawn from sale, and the remaining stock of records destroyed (apparently Columbia dumped them on HMV’s doorstep!).  But by this time many sets had already been sold.   Ironically, the stage show was a flop.

 

From a modern perspective, these arrangements demonstrate Ketèlbey’s skill as a harmonist and orchestrator, and his Polly Selection deserves to be regarded as part of his oeuvre, in the same way that Benjamin Britten is credited for his arrangement of The Beggar’s Opera, or Igor Stravinsky for Pulcinella.

 

Contents

Side 1.  Laugh boys – I will have my humours – Virtue’s treasure – Despair leads to battle – The world is always jarring.

Side 2.  Sleep o sleep – Though woman be a pretty craft – Honour calls me – As sits the sad turtle – A woman when battle presses.

Side 3.  By bolder steps – The crow or daw – For all his pain – Wait until you spy.

Side 4.  Brave boys prepare (March from Handel’s Scipio) – With sad emotion – By women won – A pirate either must sink.

           

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Orchestra

Court SO, Ketèlbey

Columbia 3249, 3250

73254, 73255, 73256, 73257

10” 78, 4 sides

[Apr 23]

BL, (TM CD)

 

 

Popular Patriotic Songs

 

A selection to promote the war effort, including the following, and more:

Side 1.  Farewell, Isabelle – Your dear old Dad was Irish – Cheer up, Molly –  Your king and country need you – Are we downhearted?

Side 2.  Sandy Boy – Kiss me goodbye – Little soldier boy – Au revoir my sweet Marguerite – My Bob – In Khaki

 

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Orchestra

Regal O, ?Ketèleby

Regal G 6818

29187, 29188

10” 78, 2 sides

[Dec 14]

TM, (TM CD)

 

 

Prelude in C sharp minor, op.16 (by “Anton Vodorinski”)

 

Medium

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Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223700

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

           

                                                                                                           

Rapsodie sérieuse, op.24 (by “Anton Vodorinski”)

 

Medium

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Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223700

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

 

 

Reflections: romantic melody

 

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Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223699

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

 

 

Remembrance: elegy

 

This is the first work produced by Ketèlbey after the death of his first wife, Lottie, on 20th February 1947.  It uses melodies from Elegy (2nd movement of Cockney Suite) and Sanctuary of the Heart, and was probably first conceived as an organ solo, though this was actually published later than a brass band arrangement.

 

The original synopsis of Elegy ran

This represents the serious thoughts which would occur to anyone passing the Cenotaph in Whitehall.  The 2nd part, in the major key, suggests the feelings of affection and tender remembrance which would prevail in the hearts of sweethearts and wives, yet with a feeling that their loved ones had died in a noble cause.

The melody quoted from Sanctuary of the Heart originally set the words:

            It told of the Joy and the Gladness

            That comes from the One above -

            "Oh Lord, hear our prayer

            Take away all our care,

            And fill all our hearts with love."

 

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Wind band

Tokyo Kosei Wind O, Akiyama

KOCD 3073

(Japanese)

CD

1988 rec.1982     

TM

The wind band arrangement is by Harold Moss.  This is actually a brass band arrangement with added woodwind parts.  The track numbering on the case and liner is incorrect – Remembrance is Track 6.

 

 

Rêverie

 

This work shares a melody with Petit Caprice, which was performed by Ketèlbey at Trinity College of Music on 6th April 1892.

 

Medium

Artists

Label

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Date

Review

Locations

Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223700

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

 

 

Rêverie dramatique: op.23/2 & 30 (by “Anton Vodorinski”)

 

This piece was first published around 1911 in a collection of three Organ Recital Pieces, op.23.  My own copy of no.2 Rêverie Dramatique has the pencil annotation “17 Sept 1911, Antwerp, 4½  min”. 

All three items were later published as piano pieces with new opus numbers.

 

Medium

Artists

Label

Matrix

Format

Date

Review

Locations

Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223700

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

Organ

Hans Uwe Hielscher (Dunedin Town Hall)

IFO ORG 72112

 

CD

2004

 

WC, TM

Hielscher’s performance follows the composer’s metronome marking far more closely than my anonymous Antwerp organist, and takes 3’ 37”.      

 

                                                                                                           

A River Rêverie: a souvenir  

 

The music of River Rêverie had appeared in the 1913 edition of Wildhawk.  A subsequent re-issue of Wildhawk in 1924 added narration, with the relevant sections having the caption "The song of the western lovers" and "A sudden attack on the coach".

The piece may derive from a lost string quartet, mentioned in British Musician December 1896, page 271.  According to Radio Times (4th September 1931) page 203,

Finding no market for these and other works [i.e. the String Quartet & Piano Quintet, etc.], he tried the experiment of taking their melodious "second subjects", dressing them up with variations, and trying them on the publishers.  In this way he "murdered his innocents" (as he puts it) with great success: the slow movement from a String Quartet made an admirable background for a river-scene in a music-hall sketch…

A River Rêverie is the only known piece from the relevant period that specifically refers to a river, and the inner moving parts could be a realisation of a quartet texture.

 

Medium

Artists

Label

Matrix

Format

Date

Review

Locations

Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223699

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

               

 

A Romantic Melody

 

Medium

Artists

Label

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Date

Review

Locations

Piano

Rosemary Tuck

Marco Polo 8.223700

CD

1993

BL, NX, PD, TM

               

 

Royal Cavalcade: coronation march

 

The copyright to this piece was allocated to Bosworth on 19th February 1937, and several versions were published in the same month, some having the note "Composed in honour of the forthcoming coronation of George VI”.  However, the copyright date actually given in the parts is 1936, suggesting that the piece was held back, perhaps due to doubts about Edward VIII’s abdication and who would actually be crowned.

 

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Military band

Band of HM Coldstream Guards, Windram

HMV B 8556

OEA 4693-1

10” 78

[May 37] rec.Mar 37

May 37 p.523

BL, (TM CAS)

Military band

Massed bands of Aldershot and Eastern Commands, Seymour (Aldershot Tattoo 1937)

HMV B 8585

OER 209-1

10” 78

[July 37] rec.2.7.37

July 37 p.68

 

Re-issue

- Victor VA 10077

OER 209

10” 78

 

 

 

Military band

Massed bands of Aldershot and Eastern Commands (Aldershot Tattoo 1937)             

HMV C 2913

2EA 3581-1

12” 78

[July 37]

July 37 p.68

BL, WC

Orchestra

anon.

Bosworth BD 103

CP 502

10” 78

[1938?]

Jan 39 p.342

WC, (TM CD)

Orchestra

Louis Voss Grand O

Bosworth BC 1146               

CP 1085

10” 78

[1942?]

WC

 

Re-issue

- Stebbings ST 37

CP 1085 (New Zealand)

10” 78

 

 

 

Re-issue

- Bosworth BPM 219

CD

2001

TM

Re-issue

- Guild GLCD 5171

CD

2010

LMS Spring 11 p.47

Orchestra

anon.

Bosworth BD 122

?

10” 78

[1945?]

 

(TM CD)

Synthesizer

Stephen Berry

private recording

 

mp3

2016

 

TM

C 2913 is only an excerpt

BD 103 is a collection of library music called Sound titles. Tracks 27-29 are brief fragments of Royal Cavalcade, with titles Eyes Right - Here come the guards - Plumes and Pennants                               

BD 122 is another set of library music, called Main and end titles. Tracks 13-14 are brief fragments of Royal Cavalcade, with titles Eyes Right - Here come the Guards                                         

 

The Bibliothèque National in Paris holds a copy of B 8585 which once belonged in Adolf Hitler’s collection at the Berghof.

 

How fast is “Tempo di grande Marcia”?  The Coldstream Guards march at a convincing 116 crotchets a minute, but the Louis Voss Grand Orchestra hurries along at 125.  Both of these recordings make two short cuts of repeated material, the former totalling 23 bars, the latter 31.   The Massed Bands take a slower pace, crotchet = 108, and cut the entire reprise and coda (45 bars); this vast ensemble has been recorded remarkably clearly, with just the bass drums being over-prominent.