Sanctuary of the Heart: méditation religieuse                                                    Back to list of works index

 

Sanctuary of the Heart is one of the few pieces by Ketèlbey imbued with emotional tension.  It means widely different things to different people.   Andrew Lloyd Webber has even said he would like it played at his funeral.

 

Composer’s synopsis

The picture in the composer's mind when writing this piece was that of a lonely wanderer from a foreign land, hearing again an old religious melody that was familiar to him in his childhood, and the memories evoked by his thoughts bring solace and comfort to the heart of the poor exile.

 

Description

Let us start with the music itself, as first published and recorded in 1924.  There are two bars of indecisive walking chords in G major, then follows a typical slow Ketèlbey melody, using the wide leaps which had previously characterised The Phantom Melody, In a Monastery Garden, Bells across the Meadows  and the Princess theme from In a Persian Market.   

 

The next phrase is in the relative minor key, accompanied by triplets. In his preface printed in the sheet music, the composer merely calls it “an old melody”.  It is in fact the traditional chant used for the Kol Nidrei during the Yom Kippur service in the Jewish liturgy.  As in that liturgy, the phrase occurs three times, each time more intensely.  This theme has an end tag, which Ketèlbey repeats quietly in order to change the key back the major.

 

This is followed by a return of the first melody, this time sung.  The poem is even included in instrumental arrangements for violin, cello, etc.  The final phrase is sung by a separate group of singers. 

I wandered alone in a strange land,

And Life seemed so dark and drear,

When the sound of a voice seemed to call me

And brought to my mind a mem’ry dear;

It told of the Joy and the Gladness

That comes from the One above -

“Oh Lord, hear our prayer,

Take away all our care,

And fill all our hearts with Love.”

 

The whole of this melody is then repeated by the orchestra, the rhythm changing from a sedate 4/4 to a livelier 12/8, now accompanied by the triplet rhythm first heard during the Kol Nidrei.  During the final cadence these triplets come to the foreground.

 

Christian interpretation

So the overt message is one of a personal religious experience akin to Paul’s conversion of the road to Damascus.  For the majority of contemporary English listeners, brought up in Anglican or non-conformist circles, the references would have been quite familiar.

 

The composer himself had been brought up in the Church of England, and as choirboy and later organist would have been familiar with the Psalms in the Book of Common Prayer.  He borrows the phrase "In a strange land" from Psalm 137 By the waters of Babylon, while Psalm 114 When Israel came out of Egypt not only has the words "strange" and "sanctuary" in close proximity, but is traditionally sung in the Church of England to a chant called Tonus Peregrinus, meaning "wanderer tune". 

 

Expanded Christian interpretation

Following the success of the orchestral piece, the composer added further words to make a full-blown song.  Here are the new verses, sung after the verse quoted above.

The sound of solemn chanting

Was borne to me from afar,

And the song seemed to draw me closer,

Like the light of a guiding star;

I turned from out the highway

To the Minster old and grey,

And the voices swelled in welcome

For a stranger come to pray.

 

My Soul was enthralled by the Message

That came from those voices clear,

And my Heart found a shelter and comfort

From the pain of this world so dark and drear;

I knew then, the Joy and the Gladness

As I prayed to the One above,

“Oh Lord, hear our prayer,

Take away all our care,

And fill all our hearts with Love.”

 

Oh Lord have mercy upon us,

And upon all those who pray

To Thee, our Father

Who heareth us this day.

 “Oh Lord, hear our prayer,

Take away all our care,

And fill all our hearts with Love.”

 

In his book From the Sanctuary of his Heart, page 138, John Sant has written:

… “the heart” of this song is set very much in the singular, and these surely are not just words inspired by liturgy and theology.  Neither are they words of casual acquaintance or doubt but rather, I believe, of a hymn and prayer of one who has tasted the goodness and grace of God…

I find it interesting and quite touching to note that, in writing these words… the composer purposely set the word “knew” in italics to distinguish it from all other words in the complete song.

 

The Jewish influence

However, there is a puzzle in the straightforward Christian interpretation.  Why use a Jewish melody to trigger a conversion to a Christian concept of love?  Why, even, was the Kol Nidrei not originally named in the music? 

 

To deal with this latter point first, there was a lot of prejudice against other religions in Britain in the 1920s.  As we shall see later, Ketèlbey had experienced this at first hand.  It was not until 1928 that, when revising his synopsis for a recording, he decided to name the tune.

 

In personal communications, Derek Reid, a scholar of Jewish tradition, has written the following about the Kol Nidrei:

The title itself translates as “All Vows”  In strictest terms the Kol Nidre is not a prayer. It is a declaration that any vows made unwittingly or rashly during the course of the previous year are from that moment null and void…  It is the first utterance and expression of the community at the start of services within the twenty-five hours that comprise the solemn occasion known as Yom Kippur [the Day of Atonement]. The whole congregation sings three times through the Kol Nidre, the cantor taking the lead through an intense and emotive rhapsodic theme…

It can honestly be said to be seen as a mass confessional; a freeing of the spirit; a wiping away of sins to the proverbial clean slate.

 

Upon its entry the Kol Nidrei theme [in Sanctuary of the Heart] is delivered in one of the most richly sweeping and swelling sounds ever expressed from the voice of the orchestra.  It is weighed with emotion but that emotion is different only in its “soul” sound.  It rises through its first declaration, getting more and more intense through the following two repetitions… to fall away and be heard no more.  Without doubt this is the most expressive and sincerest orchestral version of the strangest prayer in the Hebrew vernacular…

 

A romantic interpretation

There may well have been a personal programme underlying the piece. 

 

We know that at the age of fourteen the young Albert had been sent from Birmingham to London to study, and promptly returned to Birmingham suffering from homesickness.  The extravagantly romantic but very English main theme, which sets the words “I wandered alone in a strange land”, might well stand for Albert himself.

 

Back in London, he eventually met Lottie Siegenberg, a passionate Jewish actress, represented by the passionate Jewish chant.  At the second statement of this phrase, it takes its bass from the main theme (Lottie becoming dependent on Albert?).

  

As the main theme is played for the second time, a short counter-melody is heard in the violin, a rising scale which has been heard in the horns against the Kol Nidrei tune (Albert being influenced by Lottie?).

 

The piece ends with the main theme transformed to joyousness, by adopting the 12/8 rhythm of the Kol Nidrei – the phrase “fill all our hearts with love” connoting Albert and Lottie falling in love.

 

Prejudice against Jews and actresses was high in many parts of contemporary English society, and Albert’s family seem to have broken off all ties with him following his marriage with Lottie.  As far as is known, he subsequently neither practised Christianity nor was converted to Judaism.  His love for Lottie had become the spiritual centre of his existence.  It is perhaps significant that after her death in 1947, the next piece Albert had published was Remembrance, which combines a theme from Elegy with the main theme of Sanctuary of the Heart – surely symbolising the death of his loved one.

 

 

Sanctuary of the Heart - orchestral (with optional solo voice)

The original score had an optional solo voice and quartet in the third section. Ketèlbey later added an optional chorus to the final, fourth section, naming it the “Grand Concert Version”

 

Artists

Label

Matrix

Format

Date

Review

Locations

Court SO, chorus, Ketèlbey

Columbia 968

AX 281

12” 78

[Mar 24]               

BL, TM, (TM CD)

Grete Mancke, Edith Lorand O, chorus

Parlophone E 10198

7515

12” 78

[Dec 24]

Dec 24 p.262

     Re-issue

- Parlophon P 1807            

(German)

[Dec 24]

contralto, Court SO, chorus, Leggett

Columbia 968R

WAX 1678-2

12” 78

[Aug 26] rec.June 26

WC

     Re-issue “cond. Ketèlbey             

- Columbia 9138

WAX 1678

12” 78

[Dec 26]

Jan 27 p.315

BL, PD

     Re-issue “Concert O, Ketèlbey

- Columbia DX 775

WAX 1678

12” 78

[May 37]

May 37 p.532

BL, PD, TM

     Re-issue

- Naxos 8.110174               

CD

2001

BL, NX, TM

Frank Westfield's O (Gramophone has “Picture House O”)

Parlophone E 5809

1277-2

10” 78

[July 27]

Aug 27 p.107-108

BL

Nellie Walker (c), Concert O, chorus, Ketèlbey

Columbia 9405

WAX 3109, 3110

12” 78

[July 28] rec.Nov 27

July 28 p.61

BL, (TM CAS)

     Re-issue

- Columbia Cinema Service YBX 12

WAXD 29

12” 33

[Feb 31]

     Re-issue

- Naxos 8.110848

CD

2002

BL, NX, TM

New Empire O, vocal quartet       

Decca K 524

MA 1453-1AX (or1454-1,2?)

12” 78

[Aug 30]               

Aug 30 p.135

BL

Harold Sandler and his O

Sterno 545

?

10” 78

[Dec 30]

     Re-issue

- VLMS SP 115

CAS

TM

String O, chorus, organ (Madame Tussaud’s Cinema)

Broadcast Twelve 5206

L 0788

10” 78

[Jan 31]

Feb 31 p.448

BL

London Palladium O, male quartet, Pethers

HMV C 2202

2B 670-2

12” 78

[Oct 31]

Oct 31 p.186

BL, (TM CD)

     Re-issue

- Victor 36373

 

12” 78

[ca.1940?]

 

PD

Commodore Grand O, organ, Muscant               

Winner 5482

?

10” 78

[May 32]

     Re-issue

- Edison Bell 5581              

(American?)

[Sept?33]

BL

Albert Sandler and his O

Columbia DX 771

CAX 7932

12” 78

[Apr 37]

Apr 37 p.486

BL

Herman Darewski and his O/Band

Parlophone F 1559             

E 10039-1

10” 78

[Nov 39]

Nov 39 p.229

PD

Louis Voss Grand O

Bosworth BC 1098

CP 779

10” 78

[?1940]

     Re-issue

- Bosworth BOCD 165

CD

1990

VLM Summer 90

BL, TM

     Re-issue

- Bosworth BPM 217

CD

2001

TM

baritone, Concert O, chorus, Ketèlbey

Decca  F 7617

DR 4754-1

10” 78

[Nov 40]               

Dec 40 p.154-5

BL, TM, (TM CD)

New Promenade O, Wardour Singers, Robertson

London R 10018

DR 12251

78

[1948?]

WC

New SO of London, Robinson

Decca LK 4080

LP

[June 54]               

July 54 p.73,

Mar 55 p.464-465

BL

     Re-issue

- Decca LW 5140               

10” LP

[Dec 54]

PD

     Re-issue

- Ace of Clubs ACL 1044

LP

[1961]   

BL

     Re-issue

- Eclipse ECS 2016 (+ECM)

LP

1969

Feb 70 p.1332

BL, PD, TM

     Re-issue

- Decca DDX 190039

(Dutch)

LP

1969

 

 

     Re-issue

- Decca NUX 390044

(Dutch)

LP

1969

 

 

     Re-issue

- Decca/Universal 473720-2

 

CD

2003

June 03 p.50

BL, WC, (TM CD)

New SO of London, Sharples

Decca SKL 4077

LP

[1959]

Feb 60 p.434

BL, PD

     Re-issue

- Decca LXT 4329

(Spanish)

LP

[1960]

 

WC

     Re-issue

- Decca DFE 6665              

SP

[1961]

May 61 p.603

     Re-issue

- Decca STO 149                

SP

[1961]

May 61 p.603

     Re-issue

- Decca SKC 4077

(Spanish)

CAS

[1969]

 

WC

     Re-issue

- Decca SPA 187

 

LP

1971

July 72 p.253

BL, PD

     Re-issue

- Decca 841203

(Spanish)

CAS

1982

 

WC

     Re-issue

- Decca 452987-2

CD

1997      

BL, PD, TM

     Re-issue

- Vocalion CDLF 8143

CD

[2011]

LMS Aut 11 p42

PD

Royal Philharmonic O, Rogers

Decca PFS 4170

LP

1969 rec.Feb 69

Nov 69 p.833,

BL, TM

     Re-issue

- Decca DGS 16

(American)

LP

1980

 

 

     Re-issue

- Decca 6594064

(Spanish)

LP

1981

 

WC

     Re-issue

- Decca SPA 565 

LP

BL

     Re-issue

- Decca 425850 2DWO

LP

BL

     Re-issue

- Decca 425849-2

 

CD

[1990]

 

WC

     Re-issue

- Decca 444786-2LPF

CD

1996

Aug 96 p.60

BL, PD, TM

     Re-issue

- Polygram 4419602

CD

1998

BL

Jean Temperley (c), Ambrosian Singers, Philharmonia O, Lanchbery

EMI ASD 3542

LP

1978

July 78 p.261

BL, TM

     Re-issue

- Angel S 37483

(American)

LP

1978

 

 

     Re-issue

- Hörzu 1C 05702986Q

(German)

LP

?

 

WC

     Re-issue

- Voz de su Amo 10C 265002986Q

(Spanish)

CAS

[1980]

 

WC

     Re-issue

- CD-CFP 4637

CD

1993

Mar 94 p.114

BL, TM

     Re-issue

- TC-CFP 4637

 

CAS

1993

Mar 94 p.114

 

     Re-issue

- EMI Classics 5730002

(German)

CD

[1998]

 

WC

     Re-issue

- HMV 5724852

CD

1998

     Re-issue

- EMI 50112920

(Japanese remastering)

CD

1994 [2007]

PD, TM

     Re-issue

- EMI Classics 0724 3573 00056

 

CD

[1999]

 

NX

     Re-issue

- EMI Classics 0742 3573 00155

 

CD

[1999]

 

NX

     Re-issue

- EMI Classics 0094 6352 39959

 

CD

[2006]

 

NX

London Promenade O, Faris

Philips 6514152

LP

1982

Apr 82 p.1423

PD, TM

     Re-issue

- Philips 7337152

 

CAS

1982

Apr 82 p.1423

WC

     Re-issue

- Philips 400011-2PH

CD

1982

Apr 83 p.1152

BL, TM

     Re-issue

- Decca/Universal 473720-2

CD

2003

June 03 p.50

BL, WC

New London O, Corp

Hyperion CDA 66968

CD

1997

May 97 p.74

BL, TM

     Re-issue

- Hyperion KA 66968

 

CAS

1997

May 97 p.74

 

     Re-issue

- Hyperion CDS 44261-4

CD

?2006

VLM Autumn 06

Palm Court Theatre O, Godwin

Chandos FBCD 2002

CD

1998

 

BL, PD, TM

     Re-issue

- Chandos CHAN 6676

 

CD

 

 

NX

Marie Little (s), Pelly Concert O, Barnard

private recording

CD

[2005]

TM

Orquesta de Cámara de Universidad de Málaga, Adelberto Martinez Solaesa (organ), Gálvez

Universidad de Málaga

 

DVD

rec.June 10

 

WC

Salon-Orchester Ricardo

Ultraphon A 617

15221

10” 78

? (by 1931)

MMU

WC

Palm Court O, Leopold

?

?

     Re-issue

- Evergreen Melodies

[2007]

? perhaps organ

Columbia

WAX 3236, 3237

78, 2 sides

rec.Feb 28

 

 

 

Ketèlbey conducted this work in at least three recordings.  There is confusion over the fourth, made on 23rd June 1926 on WAX 1678-2.  This was recorded as part of Columbia’s plan to replace earlier recordings with the new electric recording, and so the new issues were not reviewed in The Gramophone.  No copy of the 968R recording has been inspected.  The matrix was used in the same year for 9138, where the label has “Court Symphony Orchestra, conducted by the Composer”.  Eight years later it reappeared on DX775, where it was now “Albert W. Ketelbey conducting his Concert Orchestra”.   A spanner was thrown in the works when Smith discovered that the recording studio diary gives the conductor on 23rd June 1926 as A.W. Leggett.  Englund has suggested that Leggett was one of Ketèlbey’s pseudonyms, but I have ample evidence that he was a separate musician.  It seems most likely to me that the marketing people at Columbia were happy to use the composer’s name for a recording ghosted by a less well-known conductor.

 

Both the 1924 and 1926 recordings make the same cuts (11 bars in all), but the latter is far faster, taking just 3’ 42” as opposed to 4’ 32” – surely evidence of a different conductor!  These two versions employ the original vocal resources of solo contralto, joined by a quartet for the final two lines of the verse.  The 1924 version may use a piano rather than harp, but the recording quality makes it difficult to judge for certain.

 

The next recording was made on 11th November 1927, a good date for emotional music – Sanctuary of the Heart was later used in a piece initially named “Remembrance Day”.  It stretches to two 12-inch sides, but even so one bar is cut from the final cadence, making the total playing time 5’ 52”.  The Grand Concert Edition is used, with chorus singing the fourth section. 

 

The late recording from 1940 is crammed on to a single 10-inch side, so19 bars are cut, leaving a playing time of 3’ 16”.  The soloist is an anonymous baritone, who is joined by a full chorus for the fourth section.

 

Other performances are summarised below. 

- The first section has a published metronome marking of crotchet=72.  The “metronome” column gives the average speed for this section.

- In the third section, the melody is given to a contralto or baritone soloist, accompanied by the cellos; in the absence of a singer, a clarinet should play.                 

Conductor

Total bars cut

Total time

Ave. metronome

Third section

Other notes

Ketèlbey (1924)

11

4’ 32”

59

Contralto + quartet

Ketèlbey/Leggett (1926)

11

3’ 42”

76

Contralto + quartet

Ketèlbey (1927)

1

5’ 52”

55

Contralto

+ Chorus

Ketèlbey (1940)

19

3’ 15”

68

Baritone

+ Chorus

Sandler           

36

3’ 19”

53

Violin

Omits final section and coda, ending with quiet high violin note

Pethers

19

3’ 50”

67

Baritone

+ Male quartet, which also joins in final refrain. Final chord diminuendo

Voss

32

3’ 01”

62

Clarinet

Harp plays more than in part. Final chord crescendo changed to diminuendo

Robinson

16

3’ 16”

66

Clarinet

Sharples

5’ 47”

53

No clarinet

Rogers

16

3’ 50”

59

Clarinet

Lanchbery

5’ 23”

57

Contralto, no cellos

+ Chorus. Horn countermelody particularly impressive in final statement of Kol Nidrei

Faris

5’ 04”

62

Saxophone

Ugly saxophone entry at 3’48”

Corp

4’ 46”

71

Clarinet

Godwin

4’ 45”

65

Clarinet

Chamber orchestra, with piano continuo (very effective on repeated triplet accompaniment).

Percussionist manages to double roll on timp with clash on cymbal

 

 

Sanctuary of the Heart - military band

 

Artists

Label

Matrix

Format

Date

Review

Locations

Band of HM Royal Air Force, Amers             

HMV C 1183

Cc 5079-2

12” 78

[Feb 25]               

BL

Band of HM Welsh Guards, Harris

Aco G 15667

C 6702

10” 78

[May 25]

July 25 p.93

     Re-issue (Beltona Military Band)

Beltona 657

C 6702

10” 78

[Jan 25]

 

 

     Re-issue (Imperial Empire Military Band)

- Duophone B 5023

G 1409

10” 78

London Fire Brigade Band

Piccadilly 482

?

10” 78

Apr 30 p.512

Massed Bands of the Southern Command (Tidsworth Tattoo 1933)

HMV C 2594

2B 5295-2

12” 78

[Oct 33]

Oct 33 p.189

BL

Band of 7th Battalion Highland Light Infantry (4th Battalion Gordon Highlanders, Mackay)

Beltona 1935

M 14549

10” 78

?

cat.1933

 

 

Sanctuary of the Heart  - organ

 

Artists

Instrument

Label

Matrix

Format

Date

Review

Locations

Paul Barnes

Homochord D 1082

?

10” 78

[Mar 27]

Mar 27 p.423

Reginald Foort

New Gallery Cinema, London

HMV C 1330

CR 1234-1

12” 78

[June 27]

June 27 p.24

BL

Re-issue

- Electrola EH 63

CR 1234-1

12” 78

MMU

WC

 

Re-issue

- World Records SH 338

 

LP

1979

 

BL, WC, TM

G.T.Pattmann

Astoria Theatre, London

Columbia 9416

WAX 3404-1

12” 78

[July 28]               

July 28 p.68

BL

Herbert Griffiths

Stoll Picture Theatre

Broadcast 359

359a

8” 78

[1929]

Apr 29 p.504

BL

 

Re-issue

- Orchestrola 2083

359a

8” 78

 

 

WC

Reginald Bawtree

Homochord D 1360      

?

10” 78

[July 29]

Aug 29 p.127

Philip Dore

Bournemouth Pavilion

Parlophone E 10952

XE 2951-2

12” 78

[Feb 30]

Feb 30 p.417

BL

Ena Baga

Tivoli, London

Hudson WF 402

BT 2422?

10” 78

 (TM CD)

Re-issue - “Wurlitzer”

- Filmaphone 449

BT 2243

10” 78

[Apr 32]

Apr 32 p.481

James Bell

Odeon Theatre, Leicester Square

Bosworth BE 19

CP 1042

10” CD

[ca1940]

 

 

Reginald Dixon

Tower Ballroom, Blackpool

Regal MR 3211

CAR 5575

10” 78

Mar 40 p.361       

BL, (?TM CAS)

 

Re-issue

- Columbia 35888

 

 

 

 

WC

Eurfryn John

Columbia 33SX 1731

LP

[?1965]

Aug 65 p.123

BL

Reginald Dixon

Tower Ballroom, Blackpool

Columbia SX (+SCX) 6131

LP

[1967]

cat.Dec 67            

BL, (?TM CAS)

Armsbee Bancroft

Burton Town Hall

DEROY 1425

 

LP

1978

 

BL

Reginald Dixon

Tower Ballroom, Blackpool

EMI ONCR 534

LP

1981

BL, (?TM CAS)

Jan Valach

 

HMV 1235411

(Belgian)

LP

[1986]

 

WC

Phil Kelsall

Tower Ballroom, Blackpool

Grasmere GRCD 43

CD

1991

BL

 

Re-issue

- Universal 4659022

 

CD

2000

 

TM

Robert Wolfe

Grasmere GRCD 56

CD

1993 rec.1992

BL

Thomas Jörg Frank

 

Bruno Hebestreit

(German)

CD

rec.Apr 09

 

WC

“Michael Cheshire” (Reginald Foort)

Wurlitzer

Eclipse SC 86

JW 1128

8” 78

[1930s]

 

 

Baga makes 4 cuts, totalling 27 bars; she used the piano version rather than the published organ version, and occasionally alters the bass line.

Bancroft plays just the main melody, as part of a “Ketelby Selection.” 

My transcript of Dixon was supplied without recording details.  He omits 8 bars of the second section and the entire fourth section.

Foort cuts 8 bars.  His choice of registrations always makes for a very clear melodic line.

Kelsall cuts a total of 18 bars, but mainly plays the published organ arrangement.  At the Kol Nidrei section, he adds a swirling embellishment which obscures the rhythm.

 

Sanctuary of the Heart - other instrumental

 

Artists

Instrument

Label

Matrix

Format

Date

Review

Locations

Archive

?

Saxophone with ?piano

Zonophone 2675

?

10” 78

[1926?]

?

Piano

Universal Roll S 12808a

roll

by 1930

Aston Banjo O, Marsh

Banjo ensemble

Regal MR 477

CAR 918-1

10” 78

[Feb 32] rec.3.12.31

PD,WC, (TM CD)

Eric Halstead

Piano

private recording

web

[2002]

(TM CD)

Trevor Workman

Carillon 

Bournville Carillon BC000005 

CD

2003

TM

Markus Staab

Piano

private recording

 

web

2009

 

 

 

 

Piano

Meloto Roll 38338

roll

?

Piano

Meloto Standard Roll 45068b

roll

?

PD

mr13

 

Piano

Themodist Roll T 24513B

roll

?

Piano

Triumph Full Scale 84703

roll

?

PD

mr18

Piano

Universal 1219

roll

?

PD

mr09

The Halstead recording is available at http://www.tradebit.com/filedetail.php/3998219-collection-of-ketelbey-midi-files-zip

The Staab version can be seen at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LpmnbWgFbyQ

 

The Aston Banjo Orchestra cuts 24 bars.  The constant tremolo seems to prevent any dynamic contrast or textual subtlety, and is rather reminiscent of the sound of rain on a tin roof.

 

The recording by Workman uses his own arrangement, and was made at a live performance on Bournville Carillon, Birmingham, on 9th August 2003.

 

 

Sanctuary of the Heart – song

The song version differs from the orchestral version in having four verses with words.

 

Artists

Label

Matrix

Format

Date

Review

Locations

Robert Howe (bt), orchestra

Parlophone E 5829               

1390

10” 78

[Aug 27]

BL

Lotte Lehmann (s), Berlin Staatsoper/Staatskapelle (chorus, orch), Römer  (organ), “Heiligtum des Herzens

Odeon  O 4818

Be 8877

10” 78

rec.20.2.30

 

 

Lotte Lehmann (s), Berlin Staatsoper/Staatskapelle (chorus, orch), Römer  (organ), “Heiligtum des Herzens

Odeon  O 4818

Be 8877-2

10” 78

rec.19.6.30

MMU

BL

     Re-issue

- Decca 23058

Be 8877

10” 78

 

 

WC

     Re-issue

- Parlophone RO 20166

Be 8877-2

10” 78

[Dec 31]

Dec 31 p.277 

BL, (TM CD)

     Re-issue

- Pearl GEMM CD 9410

CD

1990 or 1993?

WC

Harold Williams, male quartet, orchestra, Batten

Columbia DX 341

CAX 6275-1

12” 78

[Apr 32]

Apr 32 p.480

BL damaged, WC

Peter Dawson (bt), male chorus, orchestra, organ

HMV C 2491

2B 3454-II

12” 78

[Dec 32]

Dec 32 p.273

BL, PD

     Re-issue

- World Records SM 411/4

LP

1977

BL

Arthur Vivian (bt), male chorus, orchestra

Broadcast Super Twelve 3295

1288

10” 78

[1933]

Oscar Natzke (b), male chorus, orchestra, Braithwaite

Parlophone E 11439

CXE 10225

10” 78

[Mar 40]

Mar 40 p.358

BL, (TM CAS) 

     Re-issue

- New Zealand Parlophone

 

LP

[1962]

 

WC

     Re-issue

- Parlophone Encore

 

LP

[1962]

 

WC

     Re-issue

- Ode CDODE 1365

CD

[1992]

Dec 92 p.150

     Re-issue

- Evergreen Melodies C 62

CD

[1999]

PD, TM

     Re-issue

- Atoll ACD 400  

(New Zealand)

CD

2001

possibly not on

this CD

     Re-issue

- Manu

CD

2003

Ronnie Ronalde (+ whistling), orchestra, organ, Steffani 

Columbia DB 2678

CA 21330

10” 78

[May 50]

BL

     Re-issue

- Encore ENC 208

(British)

LP

[1959]

 

 

     Re-issue

- HMV 5340042

CD

?

BL

     Re-issue

- EMI 0946 37023525

 

CD

2006

 

TM

Webster Booth (t), St Stephen’s Church Choir (Dulwich), Sowande (organ)

Decca F 9921

10” 78

[June 52]

BL

Royston Smith (+ whistling), orchestra, Lockyer

Beltona IEP/SEP 45

LP

[1958]

cat.Apr.58

BL

Jan Valach

HMV 1235411

(Belgian)

LP

[1986]

 

WC

Mary Schneider (yodeller), Khan Dawson Singers, Sydney International O, Tycho

Innerworks/Ichiban D 224935

(Australian)

CD

2000

     Re-issue

- Koch International Classics 366502

?2007

(TM mp3)

 Peter Dempsey (t), Guy Rowland

private recording

DVD

rec.26.11.2009

PD, TM

The later Lehmann version can be heard at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m9ePNdWGSP4  The artist details of this recording are confused:  the label has Römer as conductor, but the Odeon catalogue has Karl Zander (perhaps for the earlier session);  Peter Dempsey says the organist is Paul Mania, the conductor Frieder Weissmann.

This version is performed in G major.  The Kol Nidrei is played by orchestrally, the third section is omitted, and the full choir joins in the final verse.  Neither voices nor chorus use the published music, and Lehmann distorts the main melody by displacing odd notes up or down by an octave;  however, she executes a beautiful descant in the final verse.

 

Natzke can be heard at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igYzyijoybE

His chorus adds a few vocalisations in the second verse, when the soloist mentions “the sound of solemn chanting” and “the voices swelled”.

 

Ronnie Ronalde sings just 4 lines, whistling the rest.  During the Kol Nidrei section, he adds a bird-song effect reminiscent of a nightingale.

 

Mary Schneider incorporates the main melody of Sanctuary of the Heart in her version of In a Monastery Garden.